Use this trick to preview and print older version files (Illustrator CS5/CS6/CC 2014 / InDesign CS5/CS6/CC/CC 2014)

June 28th, 2016 No comments

Photoshop certainly has a leg up on backwards compatibility. Not so with Illustrator or InDesign. How many times have you failed to open a file—even to do nothing more than preview or print—because it was created with a more recent version than you have? Don’t fear, there is a workaround. First, launch InDesign. Choose File > Place, navigate to the Illustrator or InDesign file that you want to print, select it, and click Open. Click on the page to place the file. You can either print this file or export it as a PDF (File > Export) for easy viewing the next time!

Share

Speed up your scrolling in large documents (Word 2000/2002/2003/2004/2007)

June 28th, 2016 No comments

If you’re editing a large document that also includes a number of images, you may find that scrolling is quite slow. This happens because Word has to load each image as you scroll, which can make your productivity drag.

Fortunately, if you display picture placeholders rather than your actual images, you won’t have to worry about this needless slowdown any more.

To display picture placeholders:

  • Select Tools | Options from the menu bar, and select the View tab. (In Word 2004, select Word | Preferences.
    In 2007, click on the Office tab, then select Word Options. Click on Advanced.)
  • Select the Picture Placeholders check box (Image Placeholders in 2004) in the Show area, and click OK.

If an AutoShape or some other drawing tool is slowing down your scrolling, there’s also a way to deal with this—hide all drawing objects. Here’s how:

  • Reopen the View tab of the Options dialog box.
  • Deselect the Drawings check box, and click OK.

 

Categories: Tips & Tricks

One trick to speed up slow file operations between servers

Moving or copying files between servers may sometimes be unreasonably slow or even come to halt. Unfortunately, any server slowness can affect a lot of people. One common culprit is that something may be going wrong with a feature in network interface cards (NIC) called TCP offload engine (TOE). TOE is supposed to help performance by offloading TCP/IP processing to the network controller. However, TOE may not always be compatible with other hardware or software features being used, particularly if the firmware or other components are outdated. In addition, a TOE NIC may have been designed for an older, slower CPU. With an updated server, it may not always make sense to offload TCP/IP processing, and doing so may even result in synchronization problems.

If you suspect a TOE problem or just want to experiment with something that may improve performance, try disabling TCP Connection Offload (IPv4) in the network adapter driver properties. (You can typically find this setting in the network adapter’s Advanced tab.) You can also make the change in the Windows Registry.

If you’ve pinpointed TOE as the problem, you may also want to consider updating the BIOS, firmware, and network adapter driver, as doing so may allow TOE to work properly without slowing things down.

For more details on TOE-related problems, consult the following web page:

www.symantec.com/business/support/index?page=content&id=TECH197934

Categories: Tips & Tricks

Don’t become too reliant on the PowerPoint Viewer!

June 28th, 2016 No comments

Having the PowerPoint viewer accessible can come in handy even when you least expect it. For example, it can save you a good deal of embarrassment if you travel to a remote location to give your presentation only to find that the computer they’ve reserved for you doesn’t have PowerPoint installed on it. But if you travel with a laptop, the PowerPoint Viewer shouldn’t be used as a replacement for the PowerPoint application unless absolutely necessary. If you’re armed only with the viewer you can present your slide show virtually anywhere, but even the tiniest edit to your slide show (such as making a last minute grammar correction) is impossible without PowerPoint installed on your computer.

Categories: Tips & Tricks

Creating your own formatting style

May 24th, 2016 No comments

If you’ve ever wanted to create a formatting style that’s different than any of the currently available styles, you’ll be glad to know that there’s an easy way to do it. First, select the cell that has the combination of formats that you want to include in the new style. Then, choose Style from the Format menu and in the Style name box, type a name for the new style. To define and apply the style to the selected cells, click OK. To define the style without applying it, click Add, and then click Close. Also, if no cells have the formats you want for the style, you can specify the formats when you name the style.

Categories: Tips & Tricks

Moderating a presentation with multiple speakers

May 24th, 2016 No comments

There are times when you have to share the spotlight with one or more fellow presenters. If it falls to you to act as moderator, here are a few points to keep in mind:
1. Plan a general outline for the presentation and alert each presenter of your need to do so. This will push people to prepare their content early and do a more thorough job.
2. Ask each presenter for some biographical information. If you need to warm up the audience or introduce each person before they present, a little background can be very helpful.
3. Correspond with the other presenters well ahead of time and always provide ample ways to contact you. In addition, make sure you ask for multiple contact routes to stay in touch with presenters.
4. Ask that each presenter consider a list of at least three questions that audience members are likely to have. Putting oneself in the place of the audience can help foster more stimulating discussion and structure a more useful presentation.
5. Make each presenter well aware of the amount of time they can use for their show, and establish a signal for where time is almost up, and when they need to finish.
6. Give some coaching as to the format of the question and answer part of the show: whether questions may be addressed before the next speaker, how many may be answered, and whether other speakers may chime in.

 

Share
Categories: Tips & Tricks

Use group policy to set permissions for registry keys

May 24th, 2016 No comments

You can use Group Policy to define access permissions and audit settings for individual registry keys, and you can also take or assign ownership of keys. Open the appropriate Group Policy Object (for example, the Default Domain Policy) in the GPO Editor and expand the Computer Configuration node, then Windows Settings, then Security Settings. Click on Registry. Note that the Registry setting is missing from the local computer GPO. By default, administrators and the system have full control permissions for all keys, users have read-only permission, and the creator/owner can assign ownership of the key.

Categories: Tips & Tricks

Add a decorative text effect with a drop cap (InDesign CS5/CS6/CC/CC 2004/ CC 2015)

May 24th, 2016 No comments

If you’re looking for a great way to draw your reader’s attention into your text, consider using drop caps. Not only do dropped caps add a decorative appeal, but they’re really easy to make in InDesign. First, select the Horizontal Type tool from the Tools panel. Click in the paragraph to which you want to apply a drop cap. Open the Paragraph panel (Window > Type & Tables > Paragraph) and enter a value in the Drop Cap Number Of Lines text box indicating how many lines of text you want to wrap around the drop cap. (You can also use the up and down arrows to change the value.) Enter a value in the Drop Cap Number Of Characters text box indicating how many characters you wish to use as drop caps. You can designate just one or two letters, or even the whole first line of text. Whichever you choose, you’ll draw your reader’s eye directly to the start of your text!

Share
Categories: Tips & Tricks

Recover Unsaved Workbooks

April 20th, 2016 No comments

We’ve all done it before—either you forget to save a workbook, you accidentally save it when you should have saved it as a different name, or maybe you lose work because of that rare power outage. Whatever the cause, there’s no need to panic when you think you’ve lost your work in Excel 2010. You can quickly and easily recover older (unsaved) versions of your workbook.

Excel 2010 saves your unsaved versions of files in a specific folder on your hard drive. Remember that these are new, unsaved files or temporary files, such as those you might open from an email or file transfer. Here’s how you can recover one of these unsaved files.

To recover an unsaved version of a file:

 

  • Open Excel 2010 and click on the File tab.
  • Click Recent on the left, and then click the Recover Unsaved Workbooks button.
  • In the Open dialog box, you’ll see the contents of your UnsavedFiles folder. For Windows Vista/7, this location is: C:\Users\User_Name\AppData\Local \Microsoft\Office\UnsavedFiles. For Windows XP, the location is: C:\Documents and Settings\User_Name\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Office\UnsavedFiles.

 

Note that the files saved in your Unsaved Files folder will no longer be available after four days from the file’s creation or modification.

Share
Categories: Tips & Tricks

Compelling Reasons for Using the XML Data Type in SQL Server

April 20th, 2016 No comments

If you need to store XML data in a Microsoft SQL Server database, you can simply store the data as text in a varchar or nvarchar column. Since SQL Server 2005, you can also define a column with the XML data type. However, you may wonder why you’d want to deal with the slight additional complexity of doing that, given that varchar works just fine.

Actually, there are important advantages to storing XML data with the XML data type. Even though the data may look just like text, SQL Server is able to store and index XML in an XML column more efficiently. And more significantly, SQL Server’s optimizer can query XML data more efficiently when it’s stored as XML. Unlike XML stored as text, you can efficiently query for or manipulate data based on portions of the XML within a single XML column. Performing an XPath query on XML in a varchar column would not only be more complicated; it could also take a long time to execute, especially given lots of data. Furthermore, modifications to XML-typed data can be performed within a transaction and rolled back or logged as necessary.

On a broader level, using the XML data type may be part of an architectural decision to opt for the inherent flexibility of an XML model instead of a relational one, in order to accommodate unstructured data. Nevertheless, the advantages of the XML data type make it useful even for individual columns within a database that’s mostly relational, as long as your database doesn’t need to be supported on SQL Server versions prior to 2005.

Share
Categories: Tips & Tricks